Prevalence of polycystic kidney disease in Persian and Persian related-cats referred to Small Animal Hospital, University of Tehran, Iran

Document Type: Short paper

Authors

1 Graduated from Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran

2 Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

3 Ph.D. Student in Clinical Pathology, Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

4 MSc in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Science, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Background: Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited genetic disease of cats, predominantly affecting Persians and Persian-related cats. Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) in Persian cats in Iran, and also to assess the relationships between PKD and gender, age as well as clinical and paracilinical manifestations. Methods: Sonographic screening examination was performed on all healthy and unhealthy Persian and Persian-related cats referred to Small Animal Hospital of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, from April 2014 to May 2015. Cats were classified as positive when at least one anechoic cavity was found in at least one kidney. Results: Of 76 Persian and Persian-related cats submitted for PKD ultrasound screening, 36.8% were found to have the disease and 63.2% were negative. Therefore, the prevalence of PKD was estimated 36.8% in Persian and Persian related cats in Tehran, Iran, which is approximately similar to prevalence in other parts of the world. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between PKD and age, as in affected cats the detection probability of renal cysts in sonography was increased in older animals. For each year increase in age, the detection probability of PKD in sonography was increased about 2.62 times.Conclusion: The prevalence of the PKD amongst Persian cats in Iran is relatively high, and insufficient attention to incidence and prevalence of PKD especially in breeding programs, would spread the disease throughout in Persian cats.

Keywords


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