Comparison of lipid changes in chicken frankfurters made by soybean and canola oils during storage

Document Type: Full paper (Original article)

Authors

1 Department of Food Science and Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Science and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, M.C., Tehran, Iran

2 Department of Human Nutrition, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Science and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, M.C., Tehran, Iran

3 Department of Basic Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Science and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, M.C., Tehran, Iran

4 Member of Young Researchers Club, School of Veterinary Medicine, Garmsar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Garmsar, Iran

Abstract

Two batches of frankfurters containing about 55% chicken meat with two different oils (including canola
and soybean) were manufactured. Batch 1 included canola oil and Batch 2 included soybean oil in the
products. Various analyses were performed to detect the lipid changes of both batches during storage. Fatty
acid composition analysis using gas chromatography showed little change in the fatty acids of either batch
over time. From a nutritional viewpoint, Batch 1 was more acceptable over time than Batch 2. Chemical
analysis included oxidation reactions, such as peroxide and TBA (Thiobarbituric acid) value and free fatty
acid analysis. Each chemical experiment had different trends at each time,but both batches had values lower
than the maximum levels at all times. With regard to microbial analysis, psychrotrophic bacteria in both
batches showed a decreasing order until day 30, and then growth increased. In Batch 1, a significant
difference was observed only on day 1, but the differenceswere more significant in Batch 2, and there were
significant differences on days 15, 30 and 45. Also, Lactobacilluscounts were not significant after the
cooking process until the end of storage (growth was not detectable after the cooking process). At the end of
storage, we concluded that Batch 1 had a higher quality and storage stability than Batch 2 and canola oil
could be a good substitution for soybean oil in meat products. The data were analyzed with GLM (repeated
measures). Differences were reported as significant at P<0.05. Also, the statistical software was SPSS ver.
11.5.

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